A management services organization (“MSO”) is an entity which would contract with a physician or a medical corporation owned and operated by physicians. The MSO could be owned by non-physicians.  The physician or medical corporation can pay the MSO for everything. Employees would work for the MSO; the MSO would pay for the lease.  The MSO would pay for all significant expenses and receive a fee for its services.

The Corporate Practice Medicine Doctrine (CPOM) is strong in California. Under this doctrine, physicians must control clinical decisions. The concern is that if business entities owned by non-physicians are permitted to control the rendering of care, they will subordinate clinical care to commercial considerations and profits. The objective, therefore, is to prevent non-physicians and non-physician-owned business entities from influencing treatment decisions.

This presents a significant constraint to physician business ventures. Specifically, if physicians or other clinical personnel work for entities other than professional medical corporations, they may be exposed to disciplinary risks, as well as to forfeiture of revenues.. For non-physician business partners, violating the CPOM may also bring both civil and, in extreme cases, potential criminal liability for engaging in medical practice without a license.


In California, the solution for avoiding violations of the CPOM in business ventures in which physicians work with businesses owned by unlicensed persons is a contractual relationship between the physician entity and the unlicensed business entity, or a “management services organization (MSO).” This is a business vehicle that permits unlicensed persons to provide services to physicians and their professional medical corporations. In its simplest form, an MSO provides basic practice support services to physicians and professional medical corporations via a contractual relationship, commonly known as a management services agreement. These services frequently include activities such as billing and collection, administrative support in certain areas, and electronic data interchange (e.g. electronic billing). Some MSO’s provide a broader set of services: the MSO may purchase many of the assets in a medical practice, such as office space or equipment. MSO’s can employ office support staff, and assist with a wide range of non-clinical functions. MSO’s can also assist in functions such as marketing. Often, MSO’s can reduce costs by bringing economies of scale and professional management experience into physician practices, thereby improving operational efficiency and reducing overhead costs.

the MSO must be carefully considered and constructed.  Review and application of relevant laws and regulations is a must.

By Matt Kinley, Esq. of the Kinley Law Practice